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20130201
20130209
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
with religions for $200, alex. kelton. what is islam? right. religions for $400. kelton, again. who is bacchus? bacchus or dionysus. yes. religions for $600 please. kelton. what is judaism? good. religions for $800. kelton. what is evangelicalism? little more specific. what is charismatic evangelicalism? no. joe or tori? joe. who are jehovah's witnesses? no. tori's not gonna ring in be a this? "what is pentecostal?" that's what we were going for. kelton, we come back to you, though. religions for $1,000 alex. answer -- daily double.on [ applause ] you have but $400. however, you can risk up to $1,000. i'll risk $1,000. okay. here is the clue. what is sikhism?
to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what the american impression is. >tavis: how wrong with you say the impression is that we have of haiti? >> i would say in many ways it is incorrect. haitians, once removed from port-au-prince, if you go to a village, these people are self- sufficient. they are poor, but they are communitarian. they help each other. they worked together, but once you put them in a cash economy, competition becomes very tense for a few resources. tavis: what entity, individual branch would you point the finger at for who is responsibl
a right to your religion. no help from the government at all on friday. >> this is part what have kathleen sebelius had to say. she said, today the administration is taking the next step in providing women across the nation with coverage of recommended preventive care at no cost, while reporting religious concerns. the administration believes it has met the concerns. >> well, shannon, for the many people whose religious rights are violated by this mandate, many of them have sued. they have been waiting for well over a year for something very simple, an exemption from the mandate. simply, that's what we do with people who have religious objections to laws. we exempt them. that's what these people have been waiting for and that's not what they got. the exemption that only applies to a house of worship was not expanded one inch. so the administration didn't do anything for the exemption or the business owners like hobby lobby. all they really did was propose a bookkeeping measure for certain religious organizations that may not really solve the problem at all. it wasn't a good feds for the re
for the president and members of congress to show off their religion one day a year? >> i think it's very odd. i think that there is a little too much overt religiosity going on. and then it suddenly put back in the pocket and then -- >> bill: no, i agree. i grew up under the creed that you did not wear your religion on your sleeve. and you know, you had it. it was real. it was genuine but you didn't brag about it. the problem i have with the prayer breakfast is everybody gets up and tries to outdo each other and how my faith is so strong and i pray all the time and i'm so close to jesus. come on. >> right. exactly. >> bill: it is not something to brag about. i don't think it's real if you brag about it. >> are you allowed to be diverse at the prayer breakfast? >> bill: no. no. it is one way. something else, sort of kind of related. we talked earlier in the week, victoria, about the fact that we've struggled with same-sex marriage in this country for so long, the president came around on it last year after evolving, he said. he did evolve. in the right direction. and took him a long time. but st
's great religions. it is a feast for the eyes and millions of pilgrims have already arrived. a sea of humanity on india's ganges river. we've waited 12 years for this festival to come around again so we sent holly williams to witness the spectacle. >> reporter: from every corner of india and by every conceivable mode of transport pilgrims are making their way to prayag, the holiest place in the hindu world for the biggest celebration on the hindu calendar the maha kumbh mela held only once every 12 years. born by their shared faith, they come here to purify themselves by bathing in the ganges the river that nurtured india's 5 civilization. om kumar is a wheat farmer from central india who told us he walked 300 miles to get here. why did you come from so far away? he made the journey, he said because the water has special power. for hindus the ganges suzuki a sacred river and they believe that bathing here during the kumbh mela will wash away their signs. the pilgrims have set up camp in a sprawling city of tents complete with banks, its own police force and traffic jams. but on sun
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking foreign language] [heart beating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playing louder] ♪ i'm feeling better since you know me ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: this song was created with heartbeats of children in need. find out how it can help frontline health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. >> harr
guarantee things like freedom of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the rd like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >> harris: pony chilling day out for a good cause. thick skinned new yorkers stripping down and taking a dip in the ice cold atlantic for the rock away plunge raising money for a teenager suffering from a life threatening disease. this year had it had a any purpose. >> we're having a plunge that is usually for cystic fibrosis
about history, religion, politics. >> you don't love your child any less because they have a mental illness. you love them probably more. sometimes i think elliot was put here on earth for us just to see if we could make it through. >> i'm a good person. >> smart. >> smart and talented. >> beat dad on jeopardy. >> usually beat dad on jeopardy. >> a lot of memories in those books. >> misdiagnosed with add as a first grader. it took years for elliot to get the correct diagnosis. asasberger's syndrome. often repetitive behaviors. he also has a mental illness. psychosis, a loss of contact with reality. >> he actually went out to a dumpster, they were building a new home, and started banging his head on the dumpster. if that doesn't break your heart, i don't know what does. to see someone go through that and now to look at elliot. >> i was delusional. >> you were delusional, but you're doing so good now. >> there were years of heartbreak and struggle. he head butted his father and the family was forced to call 911. >> elliot was thrown to the ground by a police officer, shack
they are doing so or not. >> when asked how we would guarantee things like freedom of religion without our constitution. the professor says it's up to those who believe in those ideaing to convince fellow americans they are worth withholding. shannon bream, fox news. >> harris: a huge power ball jackpot is up for grabs. we will tell you how much is up for grabs. leaping into frigid waters for a great cause. they do testify year but this time was a little bit different. ♪ [ male announcer ] why do more emergency workers everywhere trust duracell...?? duralock power preserve. locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. now...guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard
's been cloaked in secrecy and secrecy is the sacrosanct secular religion of this city. >> woodruff: so this has stirred it up? >> i think so, because of the leaked memo and the system, we are having a debate about drones. and i guess if i want a drone policy i want it run by a franciscan, not a jesuit. but he didn't really defend it, even, though. he didn't really go out there and say here is why we have to do it he saw the chairman of the committee senator feinstein try to brag an argument out of him. he was hesitant to go there because he wanted to add leer to secrecy. but because of the memo we're having the discussion. and it's being lead on the other side by the opponents ron and j rockefeller, people like that and so you know when i look at the evidence, one of the things you see is that people like barack obama who were opposed more or less are skeptical of the policy, once they are actually in in power faced with the realities you see them swing over and so it's become a f you think about if we are going to take on al qaeda, and i think the evidence is that it allows you to kil
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
the organization that it is religious and they want their employees to be similar religion. >> gregg: and they have every right. >> it's called the ministerial exception. it's in case law. it's exactly on point. if you are religious entity and focus is on that, there is a standard. they can make selections and appointments with hiring that are the same religious ilk. >> forprofit and nonprofit and you bring in the fair employment housing act. >> gregg: that is good point. by the way, that supreme court decision that we cited, due drew distinction forprofit and not. >> they are saying it's partially not for profit. this school says it is for profit, but i think that the court is going to still be the ministerial exception rule not for not for profits. >> gregg: if there is anybody that is performing a ministerial duty isn't it the teacher in the classroom, it's not the janitor. >> exactly right. >> that is the distinction in the supreme court case. >> gregg: ministerial distinction prevails. >> the ministers and teachers and not ministers. so it doesn't necessarily prevail. second of all, a minister
, specifically our melting pot of diversity. in five americans say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america, carol costello look at the reasons why. >> here's a riddle. what do comedian kathy griffin and julianne moore and mark zuckerberg have in common in. >> hopefully one of america's most famous atheists. >> they are among those who do not believe god exists that. puts atheists around 5%. according to the pew study, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. why? the answers vary. there is a very activist atheist movement under way getting the message out on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes. activist atheists have taken to you tube. ian evangelicals who tried to put the blame on godless schools for the newtown massacre. >> god didn't save the kids because he is not allowed in school. all of a sudden god respects the law of man. >> a massive crowd braved the cold for what was billed as the reason rally. >> i am here for the children in texas and other states who are being told lies about histo
pot of diversity. might surprise you that one in five americans now say they follow no religion at all. in today's i am america piece we look at the reasons why. here is a riddle what to comedian kathy griffin, julian moore and mark zuckerberg have in common. >> i am hopefully a famous atheist. >> they join bill mar in saying they do not believe god exists. various surveys put the number of atheists at 5%. according to a study in 2012, one in five people claim they have no religious affiliation at all. but why? the answers vary. one reason perhaps is that the word religious is no longer necessarily associated with being a good person. then there's a very activist atheist movement underway. getting its message out not in the mainstream media. but on social media. take these facebook pages, for example. each has hundreds of thousands of likes as atheists challenge critics on any number of news items and social issues. activist atheists have taken to youtube with huge audiences following. meet amazing atheist guy, that's what he calls himself. here he is rallying against christian evangel
that have? >> they're trying to say he was controlling her sexually and through religion. the question about the impact depends on whether the jurors believe her. it becomes really important exactly how she's describing it. she seems nervous at times. she's trying to seem uncomfortable. if the jurors don't believe that reaction, that's a big problem. if the jurors do believe that, that's entirely helpful. so, while we talk about the graphic nature and the salacious nature of the testimony, actually, the way she's responding to it becomes even more important. >> all right. there will be much, much more to tell. >> the cross-examination is still coming, next week. >> dan abrams, thank you very much. >>> time, now, for the weather. and sam champion, a lot to talk about, too, sam. >> we also have some fog that was -- yesterday, we had so much of the country with heavy fog. oklahoma city was one of those areas. yesterday, at the zero visibility point, a good part of the country. today, we're looking at more like a quarter-mile in that region. we have the warm temperatures. the long nights this ti
at the washington hilton for the official start of the national prayer breakfast. our religion correspondent lauren green live in our washington bureau. any big announcements this morning, lauren? >> reporter: jon, one surprise to many people, except the white house inner circle was the president's announcement his long time faith advisor would be leaving his post tomorrow. dubois is a young ministers whose face was not known to people outside of religious groups. he headed the president's faith based office. was buy by his side during the campaign and first term. dubois is known as the president's personal faith advisor. >> every morning he sends me, via e-mail, a daily meditation, a snippet of scripture, for me to reflect on, and it is meant the world to me and despite my pleas, tomorrow will be his last day in the white house. >> reporter: the president made no mention why dubois is leaving. not uncommon in second term for staff to do so. my sources say the white house will announce tomorrow where dubois is headed, jon? jon: did the president touch on policy at all in this breakfast? >> reporter
they are getting religion. in fact, now it's allowing us to have a discussion where there is an acknowledgement of how much has gone into boarder security. that will be a continuing efforts, but there is a huge political, again, economic add vantsage to us if we have a sensible immigration policy with the path to citizenship. the folks who are here many of them have been working. we can get them to be out in the open rather than in the shadows and and they are taxpayers and many of them are very talented. it's going to allow families to be together and probably so i think there is a lot of interest here on the democratic side in a growing awareness on the republican side somehow same way we have to address this in a substantial way. >> wait one other issue congressman. the new york sometimes is reporting that you have introduced legislation dealing with a special benefit sort of that was given one california pharmaceutical company understand obamacare that you are trying to get rid of? >> slipped in, in the fiscal cliff negotiations at the 11th hour. over on the se
has many different parts. you can talk about economics, politics, religion, intellectual history, military history. but we can also talk about social history: race, class and gender are tops on that list. >>steve: so you looked at these two universities down in texas -- by the way, why did you pick texas and those two schools? >> texas handed us the opportunity. in 1971 it passed a law saying students had to take a europe american history and then in 2009 passed another law saying that the universities had to make the syllabi of their courses publicly available within three clicks of their main page. >>steve: so you could do investigating on your own. you did this study and you determined the instructors there are placing an awful lot of emphasis on race, class and gender. why? >> why? we think that is because they have been trained to do that, that the students coming out of the graduate schools in overwhelming numbers specialize in those areas, and also because they think they're doing good. they think that there is something wrong with america that needs to be fixed, and one
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)